activities

Seminar “EU’s Digital Future Seminar #2: Assessing the Material Shaping of EU Digital Sovereignty in Response to the War in Ukraine”

Description: 

The war in Ukraine is known to have informed and inspired the acceleration of EU legislations aimed at strengthening the EU’s capacity to protect its “cyberspace” against the spread of disinformation and foreign interference, which the European Commission now equates to “ European digital sovereignty”.

While many have claimed the predominant discursive nature of digital sovereignty policies in the EU, recent sanctions banning the online broadcasting of Russian media outlets on EU territory could be interpreted as one of the first techno-material digital sovereignty measures. In this seminar, Prof. Niels ten Oever will present his latest research on this topical issue by exploring the implications of these recent sanctions for the European approach to Internet infrastructures and digital sovereignty.

Speaker:

Prof. Niels ten Oever, University of Amsterdam

You can find out more about this online event here.

activities

PhD Position in Infrastructural Ideologies in the EU, Russia, and China

Are you looking for a challenging position in a dynamic setting? The Amsterdam School for Regional, Transnational and European Studies (ARTES) currently has a vacant PhD position as part of the critical infrastructure lab, led by main researcher Niels ten Oever, PhD. ARTES is one of the five Research Schools within the Amsterdam Institute for Humanities Research (AIHR).

What are you going to do?

You will write a PhD thesis under the supervision of Dr. Niels ten Oever. You will use advanced qualitative and quantitative research methods to interrogate the geopolitics that play out in the reordering of material communication infrastructures of China, Russia, and the European Union.

Transnational communication networks have existed since 1865, but at the beginning of inter-state conflicts submarine cables would be cut. Currently, internet cables circle the globe and China, Russia, and the European Union are interconnected through the internet. Neither the war in Ukraine nor tensions between the US and China have changed that. This research will examine how the EU, China, and Russia seek to inscribe their norms and values by shaping informational flows and controls in their respective communication networks while maintaining interconnectivity with other networks. The research analyses the target countries’ policy-industry-research-implementation pipeline, to understand how their information networks take shape.

The PhD researcher will engage in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of policy documents, technical documents, mailing lists, and network measurements and validate their findings through elite interviews.

Please find the full description of the vacancy here

We will accept applications until May 10th, 2024.

activities

Postdoc Infrastructural Ideologies in the EU, Russia, and China

The Amsterdam School for Regional, Transnational and European Studies (ARTES) currently has a vacant Postdoc researcher position as part of the critical infrastructure lab, led by main researcher Niels ten Oever, PhD. ARTES is one of the five Research Schools within the Amsterdam Institute for Humanities Research (AIHR).

What are you going to do?

In this two-year full-time postdoc you will be analysing the structuration of internet infrastructure with a particular emphasis on the research-policy-implementation pipeline of information controls. You will be combining the analysis of policy documents, research papers, and technical implementation of information controls to differentiate infrastructural ideologies in the European Union, China, and Russia.

Please find the full description of the vacancy here

Deadline: 1 May 2024

activities

Sanctions, Standards, and Sovereignty: Examining Power in Communication Networks with Infrastructural Ideologies, Centre Internet et Société (CIS), Paris

Despite ever-increasing discourse about internet fragmentation and digital sovereignty, the world has never been more digitally connected. At the same time, information networks are continuously being reconfigured by states and corporations at different layers of the stack. Taking this into account, what methods and theoretical approaches can be levered to analyze power in communication networks today? In this talk we will analyze the implementation of EU sanctions against Russian media, and the development of 5G and internet standards to see how the developing framework of infrastructural ideologies can help us understand the shaping of global communication infrastructures while taking the political and the material into account.

Niels ten Oever – assistant professor at the European Studies department and co-principal investigator with the critical infrastructure lab at the University of Amsterdam

Valentin Goujon – Doctorant au médialab (Sciences Po)

Hugo Estecahandy – Doctorant chez Institut Français de Géopolitique

Date: Fri, Apr 26, 2024, 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM

More info here

activities

Talk “Geographical” at Expanded Publishing Fest #2 – Space-in / Space-out, OT301, Amsterdam

Our internet-connected devices hold an unprecedented power to multiply us into a manifold of realities. The conventional way to conceptualize this is segregational – we “space-out” and we’re in cyberspace. However, as Heidegger noticed, one of the essential spatial practices of living beings is coming-into-nearness: “spacing-in”. Adding Lefebvre, the space that we space-out and space-in is a social product: not simply an element or sphere within which the social operates, but rather the expression of it. It’s a multitude of connections, flows of communication and capital, conditioned by politics and economic relationships, defined by class struggles, represented by those in power, and lived by those who are subject to that power. The complex composite of ontologies that are unified within the internet are territories where cables and devices are juxtaposed with class struggle, virtual internet protocols, geopolitics, and human cognition. The escapist “spacing-out” is only one part of the picture. Let’s space-in.

More info on OT301 website here